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Sylvia - Vienna Ballet Tickets

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Sylvia - Vienna Ballet

Venue: Vienna State Opera

 
Opernring 2
1010 Wien
Austria
 
 
All dates
Season 2018
 
Season 2019
 

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Next performance (see season calendar above for other dates)
Sylvia - Vienna Ballet
Sat 24 November 2018
Category 1.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera 151 € Add to cart
 
Category 2.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera 122 € Add to cart
 
Category 3.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 4.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 5.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
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Category 6.; Seats side by side
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 7.
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19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
 
Sylvia - Vienna Ballet
Wed 28 November 2018
Category 1.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera 151 € Add to cart
 
Category 2.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera 122 € Add to cart
 
Category 3.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 4.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 5.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 6.; Seats side by side
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
Category 7.
Hour Hall Price Tickets Buy
19:30 - 22:30 Vienna State Opera
On Request
 
 
 
Event details
 

Libretto

“ Boy loves girl, girl captured by bad man, girl restored to boy by god ”

 —Sir Frederick Ashton, who choreographed Sylvia in 1952.

The libretto of Sylvia is often regarded as one of the ballet's weak points. The simple plot does not allow for much acting nor is it especially gripping. Indeed, when Frederick Ashton rechoreographed the ballet in the 1950s, he tried to rework the story to be more interesting (while still retaining its classical themes) because he recognized this aspect of the ballet as a potential pitfall. Morris simplified the story — for his 2004 production — for the same reasons. He called it, "a big wonderful mishmash of mythology and history", so he changed it to make it more, "clear and beautiful".

 

Act I: A Sacred Wood

The ballet begins with a scene of worship as creatures of the forest dance before Eros. Aminta, a lowly shepherd, stumbles in on them, disrupting their ritual. Now Sylvia, the object of Aminta's desire, arrives on the scene with her posse of hunters to mock the god of love. Aminta attempts to conceal himself, but Sylvia eventually discovers her stalker and, inflamed, turns her bow towards Eros. Aminta protects the deity and is himself wounded. Eros in turn shoots Sylvia. She is hit, and though not badly wounded, the injury is enough to drive her offstage.

A hunter, Orion, is revealed to also have been watching Sylvia, when he is seen celebrating the unconscious Aminta. Orion conceals himself again as Sylvia returns; this time she is sympathetic towards Aminta. As the huntress laments over her victim, she is kidnapped by Orion and carried off. Peasants grieve over Aminta's figure until a cloaked Eros revives the shepherd. Eros reveals his true identity and informs Aminta of Orion's actions.

 

Act II: Orion's Island Cave

Captive in Orion's island hideout, Sylvia is tempted by him with jewels and wine to no avail. Sylvia now grieves over Aminta, cherishing the arrow pulled from her breast nostalgically. When Orion steals it from her, Sylvia gets her captor drunk until he is unconscious, whereby she retrieves her arrow and appeals to Eros for help. Sylvia's invocations are not in vain, for Eros quickly arrives and shows his summoner a vision of Aminta waiting for her. The duo depart for the temple of Diana, where Sylvia's love awaits.

 

Act III: The Sea Coast near the Temple of Diana

Aminta arrives at the temple of Diana to find a bacchanal but no Sylvia, who will soon arrive with Eros. After a few moments of mirth at the reunion, Orion shows up, seeking Sylvia. He and Aminta fight; Sylvia barricades herself in Diana's shrine and Orion attempts to follow. The goddess of the hunt, outraged at this act, smites Orion and denies Aminta and Sylvia congress. Compassionate Eros gives Diana a vision. The goddess reminisces over her own young love of Endymion, also a shepherd. Diana has a change of heart and repeals her decree. Aminta and Sylvia come together under the deities' good will.

 
Program details
 

Conductor: Kevin Rhodes

 
Venue
 
Vienna State Opera
 

Public Transport
 

Subway lines: U1, U2, U4
Trams: 1, 2, D, J, 62, 65
Buses: 59A
Local Railway: Badner Bahn
Stops: Karlsplatz / Opera

Taxi stands are available nearby.
 

Parking



Parking is only € 6, - for eight hours!

The Wiener Staatsoper and the ÖPARK Kärntner Ring Garage on Mahlerstraße 8, under the “Ringstraßengalerien”, offer the patrons of the Vienna State Opera a new, reduced parking fee. You can park in the Kärntner Ring Garage for up to 8 hours and pay only a flat fee of € 6, -. Just validate your ticket at one of the discount machines inside the Wiener Staatsoper. The normal rate will be charged for parking time greater than 8 hours. The validation machines can be found at the following coat checks: Operngasse, Herbert von Karajan-Platz, and the right and left and balcony galleries.

Important: In order to get the discount, please draw a ticket and do not use your credit card when entering the garage!

After devaluing your ticket in the Wiener Staatsoper you can pay comfortably by credit card or cash at the vending machines.

The machines accept coins and bills up to 50.- Euro. Parking time longer than 8 hours will be charged at the normal rate.
 

History



The structure of the opera house was planned by the Viennese architect August Sicard von Sicardsburg, while the inside was designed by interior decorator Eduard van der Nüll. It was also impacted by other major artists such as Moritz von Schwind, who painted the frescoes in the foyer, and the famous "Zauberflöten" (“Magic Flute”) series of frescoes on the veranda. Neither of the architects survived to see the opening of ‘their’ opera house: the sensitive van der Nüll committed suicide, and his friend Sicardsburg died of a stroke soon afterwards.

 

On May 25, 1869, the opera house solemnly opened with Mozart's Don Giovanni in the presence of Emperor Franz Joseph and Empress Elisabeth.
The popularity of the building grew under the artistic influence of the first directors: Franz von Dingelstedt, Johann Herbeck, Franz Jauner, and Wilhelm Jahn. The Vienna opera experienced its first high point under the direction of Gustav Mahler. He completely transformed the outdated performance system, increased the precision and timing of the performances, and also utilized the experience of other noteworthy artists, such as Alfred Roller, for the formation of new stage aesthetics.

 

The years 1938 to 1945 were a dark chapter in the history of the opera house. Under the Nazis, many members of the house were driven out, pursued, and killed, and many works were not allowed to be played.

 

On March 12, 1945, the opera house was devastated during a bombing, but on May 1, 1945, the “State Opera in the Volksoper” opened with a performance of Mozart's THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO. On October 6, 1945, the hastily restored “Theaters an der Wien” reopened with Beethoven's FIDELIO. For the next ten years the Vienna State Opera operated in two venues while the true headquarters was being rebuilt at a great expense.

 

The Secretary of State for Public Works, Julius Raab, announced on May 24, 1945, that reconstruction of the Vienna State Opera would begin immediately. Only the main facade, the grand staircase, and the Schwind Foyer had been spared from the bombs. On November 5, 1955, the Vienna State Opera reopened with a new auditorium and modernized technology. Under the direction of Karl Böhm, Beethoven’s FIDELIO was brilliantly performed, and the opening ceremonies were broadcast by Austrian television. The whole world understood that life was beginning again for this country that had just regained its independence.

 

Today, the Vienna State Opera is considered one of the most important opera houses in the world; in particular, it is the house with the largest repertoire. It has been under the direction of Dominique Meyer since September 1, 2010.

 
 
LATEST NEWS
Buy now opera,ballet and classical concerts tickets at famous theaters in Europe
 
Tickets Booking for famous theaters in Europe. Concerts and classic concerts tickets. Buy online tickets for opera and ballet events at Vienna State Opera, Teatro la Fenice, OPERA GARNIER and OPERA BASTILLE in Paris, etc.